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Go back to school or start your career?

 

Is it better to go back and study, or go into the career, and learn the skills along the way?

Introducing Advice@RandstadCanada – Advice for Canadian Employers, Employees and More

Randstad Advice

The world of work is full of questions, misconceptions, myths and mysteries. To help shed light and answer these, the Randstad Blog, is starting the Advice@RandstadCanada Series, where we’ll endeavor to personally answer as many of your questions on employment related topics as we can.

Please submit your questions to social@randstad.ca, we’ll try to get back to everyone with some advice and will publish questions and answers that are of the greatest interest to the public.


Our first question comes from a Linkedin user: Is it better to go back and study, or go into the career, and learn the skills along the way?

Education versus experience is a constant question for Canadian employees, employers and students. It is more than a philosophical debate about paying for education to learn opposed to being paid to do work and learn.

In a survey of 400 Canadians this past July, the 84% argreed to the following statement,  “I believe experience weighs harder than education in finding a suitable job,”  84% of Canadians agreed or strongly agreed." 

There are simply some skills and habits you can’t learn in class. If you’ve ever worked in an office before, there are cultural idioms, work reporting habits or knowing how to have your voice heard in a board meeting that you can’t necessarily learn in college or university.

The flip side of this is that university courses teach you methodologies for sharing, sourcing and organizing knowledge and thoughts in a more constructive and legible way than flying by the seat of your pants. There are also distinct career benefits when entering the workforce for having a degree. Yes a piece of paper (along with 4+ years of demanding at times gut wrenching hard work), will open doors for you if you know where to look.

The question is however, should I go back and study, or go into the career and learn the skills along the way.

If you already have a backbone of the required education, you should have the baseline skills you need to do the job and it is a matter of confidence in those skills and having evidence in applying them to the industry you’re seeking to work.

If you aren’t confident in those skills yet, that’s okay. Most people when they embark on something new are a little fearful of their abilities. Great writers, business people and athletes have a constant fear that they are in fact lying to the world while performing their work, it is called Imposter Syndrome.

I’m not suggesting that’s what is plaguing you at the moment, all I’m saying that is that fear of the unknown and some level of self-doubt is natural.

If you need new skills, or a certification go back to school. If you need to build your confidence up, apply to an internship or a temporary role and begin to demonstrate your skills, not only to your employer, but to yourself.  


Do you have a question for Advice@RandstadCanada, please submit your questions to social@randstad.ca, or ask us on Twitter @RandstadCanada.

We’ll try to get back to everyone with some advice and will publish questions and answers that are of the greatest interest to the public.

Lying to your boss

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Digital Marketing Series for Job Hunters

To help you manage your online brand, Randstad Canada has produced a series of personal digital marketing tips and tricks.

  1.      Managing your personal brand online
  2.      A good Linkedin profile can get you hired.
  3.      Linkedin job search strategy 
  4.      How to find a job using Twitter

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