Randstad Canada HR Blog

Ask Our Leaders: Shannon Young, Director of Human Resources, Randstad Canada.

Posted by Alex Schmaltz on Wed, Dec 09, 2015 @ 01:09 PM

wsb-social-ask-leaders.en-5.pngThrough our Women Shaping Business program, we want to provide you with valuable insights that you can use to assess the leadership of women in your organization, evaluate your own professional career growth plan, and inspire you to reach out, connect and keep the conversation going.

With this in mind, Randstad Canada’s Leadership team invites you to submit a burning question you have on career development, mentorship, leadership skills, or any other topic around women in business. Submit your question using the form here and a member of our Ask Our Leaders panel will provide insightful advice to help you manage your career.

This week’s featured Randstad Leader is Shannon Young, Director of Human Resources, Randstad Canada.

 

What is your advice to newcomers in Alberta looking for jobs? What should they do to not to get demotivated from the current situation while managing their expenses.

 

Staying motivated in a down economy can be tough, and even more so for a newcomer.  As difficult as it may seem, it’s important to stay positive and keep an optimistic outlook when job hunting.  I recommend anyone looking for a job to be as active as possible, and keep an open mind when considering opportunities.

Networking is always a good way to stay active and get your name out there. Look for local employment groups or Professional Associations in your field of work, some of them have nights dedicated to job seekers. Some may even have mentorship programs that will help you meet successful people working in your chosen field. Job fairs are also a great way to see what’s out there and who’s hiring.  As a newcomer, there may also be community organizations that offer job search or resume assistance. Stay active on social media like LinkedIn and don’t be afraid to let everyone know you are looking.

When looking for work in your field, whether you’re new to the area or to the working world itself, keep an open mind. I speak to many people who are focused solely on the perfect job, a specific title, or even company. They limit their own opportunities by narrowing their idea of what they can accept.  I’m not saying it doesn’t pay to have standards or a lofty goal in your search, but consider opening your search in terms of geography, job titles, and even industry.  Don’t be afraid to consider contract or consulting openings. Even if you’re looking for full-time, they may lead to a permanent opportunity down the road.

Consider volunteer opportunities in your desired companies, although they may be limited to students, it’s working asking. Volunteering with your local community organizations can also help your networking and keep you busy!  For starters, look at what charities your target companies are supporting, they may be tied to or relevant to your industry and allow you to apply your skills in a meaningful way.

Lastly, look at school programs, whether it’s adding a new designation, or just updating your credentials, it could improve your profile and chances of edging out other applicants. Schools are also a great way to connect with employers!

If you keep at it, your efforts will be rewarded in time.

 

 

  Have a question for our leaders? Submit it now!

About our Leader

Shannon Young joined Randstad Canada in January 2012, starting as a Senior HR Business Partner, she was later promoted to Director, Human Resources in 2014.  As an HR leader, she and her team are responsible for delivering a full range of HR programs across Canada, and developing employee programs that drive high performance and engagement.

Shannon has 15 years’ experience in human resources, including 10 years in leadership roles with multi-national companies.  Prior to joining Randstad, Shannon spend almost 8 years with Staples Advantage Canada, leading the HR function for the largest region in Canada, employing effective people strategies that lead them to be named one of the 50 Best Workplaces in Canada by the Globe and Mail for three years.  Rounding out her breadth of experience, she also spent two years in Sales Management with Staples.    

Shannon holds a Bachelor of Arts Honors degree with a Major in Psychology, she completed the Human Resources Management Certificate at Sheridan College, and holds the CHRL designation.

 

 

 

 

Tags: Women Shaping Business, Womenshapingbiz

Empowering women through mentorship: a conversation with Saadia Muzaffar

Posted by Alex Schmaltz on Thu, Dec 03, 2015 @ 03:02 PM

Saadia-1.jpgSaadia Muzaffar is a tech entrepreneur passionate about connecting ideas, bridging people, and changing the ratio. She happily paid her dues in finance before crossing over to the not-for-profit sector to help support Canadian startups in the technology and innovation space. Saadia is part of the Global Team for Kauffman Foundation’s Startup Weekend, leads a Lean In Power Circle, and is part of ADC Canada’s Let’s Make the Industry 50/50 Initiative. Currently,Saadia is working with AudienceView. Connect with her on Twitter at @ThisTechGirl where she advocates for women’s leadership in the Canadian economy.

 

What are the benefits of mentorship?

So the great thing about mentorship is that in its essence it’s a very simple concept. It’s being able to look back and see where you had difficulty in your career and making sure that you can do something today to help people make their journeys are a little bit easier and their results a little bit better. Leadership is also so much of that, thinking of your contributions as more than just your career or your personhood and bringing more to the table than just a one dimensional advancement agenda. So it’s equal parts guiding and learning and both mentorship and leadership have that in common, which is why a lot of good mentors make really good leaders.

How do you choose a good mentor?

I think it’s important to remember that mentorship is a two way street. Even though your mentor might have seniority in terms of experience, anybody should go into that kind of relationship building thinking they can also provide value and give back. So picking a good mentor isn’t just scouting people who you think benefit you, you should also look at how you can lend some perspective, some time, and give back to them. And I think that’s what makes a really good mentor and mentee relationship.

What can organizations do to empower women?

I think organizations can make a huge difference in creating spaces where women can not only have access to great opportunities but be able to excel. The first thing that they can do is pay them equally and equitably. The second thing that they need to do is create a culture of transparency. And the third very important thing is to continuously work on this maddening and conscious bias. We all have it and we can be better at it.

What impact do women have on the economy and the growth of organizations? What do they bring to the table?

I like to think of what women bring to the table as what diversity would bring to the table. Any set up where there is a homogenous set of people who are making decisions, there tends to be groupthink. So women, just like other types of diverse representations of people, bring in resilience and empathy and collaboration. These are things that we have had to use a lot of because of how a lot of society has been structured, but these can also become our strengths. So I am not fond of saying that there’s a special sauce that women bring, but I do think that there are skill sets that we bring to the table that are usually not present. Just by virtue of the experiences that we’ve had.

Want more insights on becoming a great leader or download a copy of our Women Shaping Business Study 2015? Go to http://www.womenshapingbusiness.ca

Join the Women Shaping Business Linkedin Group, and keep the conversation going all year around!

Follow us on Twitter @RandstadCanada with hashtags #womenshapingbiz and #mywfactor

 

Tags: Women Shaping Business, Womenshapingbiz, Women in Tech

Identifying leaders: a conversation with Shoana Prasad

Posted by Alex Schmaltz on Thu, Dec 03, 2015 @ 04:30 AM

shoana2.jpgShoana Prasad, executive coach and founder of Glenwood Consulting Group Inc., brings over 15 years of executive development training to her client portfolio. She offers communications training, coaching and executive branding work. Her clients include financial institutions, consumer products, pharmaceutical and healthcare, as well as media and technology. Outside the corporate space, Shoana is a regular speaker at York University’s Schulich School of Business in Toronto and the McGill Business School in Montreal. In addition, Shoana leads programs in personal branding for Women of Influence Inc. and has prepared speakers for Toronto’s first-ever Women’s TEDx. 

 

How do we identify female leaders in your organization?

I really see a few things, I see number one business acumen. I mean, any leader has to be able to see every angle of the business. They have to understand the people who drive those numbers and they have to be able to communicate in a way that really draws out the priorities for the business and how the team can prioritize some of those needs moving forward. I think the other piece of it is communication skills. I think it’s important to be somebody who can speak in facts, and data, and stats, but also speak in narrative. Speak in a way that really resonates and is relatable not only to the executive team, but middle management and people at the entry level because these of course are the leaders who you’re building. So you’re trying to build this talent and retain this talent. I think the other thing is this illusive thing called presence and I’m even going to loop this to this idea of your personal brand. What is that thing that you have and that feeling that you leave people that you need in order to motivate and to really drive people to the next level. Even in moments where they’re not really sure if they’re capable and they’re struggling with their own impostor syndrome. So I think it’s a lot of those things and of course a million other different factors as well.

 

How do you assess and develop your leadership skills?

Ask a lot of questions. Ask people where they’re good and where they could be even better. I think it’s a very difficult thing to, it’s not difficult to ask the question, it’s difficult to hear the answer in some cases. But you’ve got to ask it with sincere curiosity, you’ve got to ask it with a hope and a want that you can be even better. And that with this information you’re going to be even more successful leader that is open to feedback and positioning yourself as somebody who is truly somebody who is approachable and accessible and I think that’s incredibly important for leaders today.    

 

Want more insights on becoming a great leader or download a copy of our Women Shaping Business Study 2015? Go to http://www.womenshapingbusiness.ca

Join the Women Shaping Business Linkedin Group, and keep the conversation going all year around!

Follow us on Twitter @RandstadCanada with hashtags #womenshapingbiz and #mywfactor

Tags: Women Shaping Business, Womenshapingbiz, women in leadership

Ask Our Leaders: Patricia Taillon, Regional Director of Professional Services in Finance & Accounting

Posted by Alex Schmaltz on Wed, Dec 02, 2015 @ 03:20 PM

 

wsb-social-ask-leaders.en.png

Through our Women Shaping Business program, we want to provide you with valuable insights that you can use to assess the leadership of women in your organization, evaluate your own professional career growth plan, and inspire you to reach out, connect and keep the conversation going.

With this in mind, Randstad Canada’s Leadership team invites you to submit a burning question you have on career development, mentorship, leadership skills, or any other topic around women in business. Submit your question using the form here and a member of our Ask Our Leaders panel will provide insightful advice to help you manage your career.

This week’s featured Randstad Leader is Patricia Taillon, Regional Director of Professional Services in Finance & Accounting at Randstad Canada.

 

This week's question:

I am an accountant and my profile is liked by many recruiters, but there are no jobs or very few that I am getting calls for. I am trying every day to build network. What advice can you give me?

 

Networking is super important but you need to have more than a Linkedin profile or a presence in any other social media channel. Follow companies that you're interested in: you'll learn more about them and know when positions open up. Knowledge about those companies will help you to adjust your resume or provide you with talking points when you are presented with an opportunity to meet with them.

It is also important to have a presence in accounting networks like the CPA association or the chamber of commerce. You'll open yourself up to meeting likeminded individuals who work in your industry and who may be able to help you with your job search. These associations are also great for meeting company representatives and recruiters from agency or companies.

Lastly, I would suggest calling those agencies who have liked your profile to discuss your career expectations. It is important to stay top of mind with recruiters- Timing is everything! Make sure to leave an impression with the recruiter. Your personality is what will bring added value to companies on top of your technical skills.

 

About our Leader:

Patricia_Taillon.jpgPatricia joined Randstad Canada in 2005 as a staff consultant. Since his arrival, she has held the positions of Certified Staffing Consultant, Account Manager, Team Leader, Financial Services Senior Branch Manager and most recently Regional Director of Professional Services in Finance & Accounting. Patricia is active in the business community of Greater Montreal with the following organizations: InterConnection program of the Chamber of Commerce of Montreal, the Young CPA of Montreal and the Association of CPA Montérégie. In addition, she has been involved with ESG UQAM as a mentor for 2nd cycle graduates in Finance & Accounting.

Tags: jobs, tips, Womenshapingbiz

International Women’s Day: #MakeitHappen

Posted by Social Team @Randstad on Fri, Mar 06, 2015 @ 02:19 PM

IWDWith International Women’s Day on March 8, there are empowering activities taking place across the country.

This year’s theme is #MakeitHappen celebrating women’s achievements while calling for greater equality.  

Through Randstad Canada’s Women Shaping Business program we’ve have been so proud to be a part of this conversation and to bring insightful discussion with business leaders and experts who #MakeitHappen all year round. Take a look back at this year’s Women Shaping Business Toronto panel discussion and listen to an engaging conversation about mentorship and personal development of female leaders.

 There are also many events taking place across Canada, here are some of the best!

National:  Sunday, March 8, 1.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m.

EQUITY HACKATHON: Put on by Equity in Theatre, join teams as they load new International Women’s Day content into Wikipedia

This IWD help us increase visibility in the arts by adding wiki pages on women in Canadian theatre to the internet. We will have locations set up throughout the country on Sunday, March 8th to get together and type! Contribute to an already published wikipage or create your own. Our website provides links and step-by-step information on how to publish and we will be available via email or our contact page if you have questions

Toronto:  Sunday, March 8, 12.00 p.m. to 2.00 p.m. 585 Dundas St E Toronto, ON M5A 2B7

Celebrate with Olivia Chow: In 2013, Olivia Chow was a member of the Toronto, Women Shaping Business Panel held by Randstad Canada, join her and New Comer Women’s Services Toronto for a networking potluck fundraiser.

Ottawa: Saturday March 7

Blush 2015:An evening of pampering, beauty and fun as we celebrate International Women's Day!​”

You can find a full list at the official International Women’s Day Event in your region here. Or take part in the discussion by using #MakeitHappen, on Twitter. Tweet at @RandstadCanada.

Tags: Womenshapingbiz

Women Shaping Business a Year in Review; #Womenshapingbiz

Posted by James Rubec on Thu, Feb 12, 2015 @ 10:02 AM

What we've learned, what is coming next?

Editor’s Note: Women Shaping Business is a program dedicated to shining a spotlight on diversity in the workplace of all types. Since 2012, Randstad Canada’s Women Shaping Business program focused on a survey conducted by Ipsos Reid of women working in Canada both executives and employees, to gain a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities that women face in the world of work. In the last three years, this has expanded to discuss progress all workers can make to help them achieve their personal goals and career objectives.

WSB2014_MTL1

On November 4, 2014, Randstad Canada held a panel discussion on mentorship and gender equity in Montreal, Québec as part of this year’s Women Shaping Business program. The panel featured; Nancy Venneman Présidente et fondatrice de l’entreprise Altitude Aerospace, Elizabeth Alves Vice-Présidente, Audit interne et gestion des risques chez Cogeco, Présidente du CA du chapitre du Québec de l’Association canadienne des femmes en communication et technologie (FCT), Ryan Hillier Avocat chez Blakes et président de la Jeune chambre de commerce de Montréal and Ruth Vachon Présidente-directrice générale du Réseau des Femmes d’affaires du Québec.

Toronto-WSB

On November 12, 2014, Randstad Canada held a panel discussion on mentorship and gender equity in Toronto, Ontario as part of this year’s Women Shaping Business program. The panel featured five great speakers including Spencer Saunders the President of Art & Science Digital Experience Design, Katherine Dimopoulos the Head of Marketing and Brand Experience at SCENE, Fawn Annan President & Group Publisher IT World Canada & Chair, Canadian Channel Chiefs Council, Ingrid Macintosh the Vice President of Portfolio Advice and Investment Research, TD Bank Group and Michael Kyritsis the VP of People and Values, Bond Brand Loyalty and was moderated by Linda Galipeau, the CEO of Randstad North America.
Calgary-WSB
On November 13, 2014, Randstad Canada held a panel discussion on mentorship and gender equity in Calgary, Alberta as part of this year’s Women Shaping Business program. The panel featured; Anna Murray, Founder Young Women in Energy, Dr. Rebecca Sullivan, Professor, Department of English Women's Studies Program, University of Calgary, Chris Marks, Global Talent Acquisition Leader for Ensign Energy, Farah Mohamed, Founder & CEO G(irls)20, Kelly Norcott, Sales Director, Telus Business Solutions; Regional Chair Connects - The Telus women's Network and was moderated by Linda Galipeau, Randstad North America’s CEO and Randstad Canada’s founder.

Men should have a seat at the table in the discussion about gender diversity

On the face of it, it sounds counter intuitive. The He for She solidarity movement put forward by UN women make a case for men to be part in the discussion on female leadership – and the reasoning is sound. First, you have to identify that men aren’t the root cause of the problem – traditional organizational structure, unconscious bias and advancement strategies are. By bringing men into the discussion whole heartedly, it opens the door to a broader discussion about not just how to bring more female leaders up the ranks – but into how to improve organizational efficiency, find better leaders and improve the business.

Accommodate is not enough - organizations need to adapt 

In one discussion held on our Toronto panel this year, the word ‘’accommodate’’ was used to describe what organizations can and should do to help women reach work life balance or workplace harmony. The problem with accommodation is that it implies there is solution for a punctual, limited or short-term problem. But as organizations need more and more skilled workers, and women form a huge proportion of this workforce, while still struggling to juggle job and family responsibilities, accommodating will not be enough. And where accommodate fails, adapt supersedes – it implies that a system will change and evolve to address the problem permanently. In the case of gender diversity, organizations should not accommodate half of the working population, they should adapt to an imbalance that need to be solved.

Gender and family issues aren’t just women’s issues, they are workplace issues

In all of our panel discussions held this year, we had stories that highlighted diversity issues that could have been prevented with training. One story was about a senior professor at a university who was looking for a way to improve the work life balance for this teachers who had children. He instituted a new mandate, stipulating that teachers with parents would no longer teach afternoon classes, thinking that in doing this, he’d make their lives easier.

He was wrong. His change placed a burden on everyone – teachers who had arrangements for afternoon care for their children no longer needed it, teachers who didn’t have children were now forced to teach more afternoon class, which impacted them in uncounted ways. The lesson in the story: family issues are workplace issues, not specifically ones of gender, and they impact everyone whether you have a family or not.

Diversity_boards

Sponsorship is key … self-promotion too:

The role of a sponsor is to help you develop your career, promote you internally, and help you advance in an organization. The mentor, on the other hand, is more of a coach, giving you advice and sharing their experiences on specific issues. Sponsors and mentors are very strong allies, but you also need to keep evaluating yourself and looking for ways to improve. 

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And while it is a good thing to assess your progress, you should avoid giving too much into self-criticizing and self-doubt. Display your ambition so other managers understand your goals, and speak openly about your success. Women have a tendency to minimize their successes - be proud of your accomplishments and do all you can to promote them. 

Women on boards, women in STEM: are we doing enough?

The question that we posed this year and is becoming more prevalent in the discourse around gender equity, is, “Is this enough?”Through research and our discussions, we see that female leaders advocating for more women in executive positions in their organizations have an impact – more women are given opportunities.  There has been great progress, as you can see below, in a graph published in the 2014 Board Diversity Report Card published by the Canadian Board Diversity Council. Organizations with more female 

board members have more female executive members. The impact of more women on boards means more women in positions of power.

diversity-2

The question that we posed this year and is becoming more prevalent in the discourse around gender equity, is, “Is this enough?”

In the fields of Science, Technologies, Engineering and Mathematics that’s a resounding no. In IT and natural resources, again we’re seeing too few women entering the job market and when they get there, they are leaving too early. Here is an example: in Manitoba[1], only 8% of professional engineers are women. Another large proportion of women who are trained and have paid dues to their representative engineering association choose not to work as engineers.

Below is a graph of female engineering membership and due-payments in Manitoba, through the Association of Professional Engineers & Geoscientists in Manitoba (APEGM). Members of the APEGM, who are women only 15% are practicing currently – versus 33% who are deferring their dues.

 man

The challenges of training more women in STEM fields is real, as is the capacity for organizations and work cultures to keep them in these fields once they are in these careers.

This year we hope to explore why these dynamics exists and what companies are doing to improve the world of work for women

 

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Get a copy of Randstad Canada's Women Shaping Business Research today.

This year will be an exciting time for diversity in the workplace and we hope that we can continue to provide you with valuable insights, research and advice on growing in the world of work.

 

Tags: Canadian employment, Womenshapingbiz, gender equity

Women Shaping Business: Toronto Panel Discussion

Posted by James Rubec on Wed, Dec 10, 2014 @ 12:26 PM

Women Shaping Business: Toronto Panel Discussion


The 2014, Women Shaping Business program brought together some amazing leaders to discuss mentorship, gender equity and the advances that organizations have made in building stronger leadership teams through diversity.

In the second event held this year on November 12, 2014, Randstad Canada welcomed over 200 business leaders from across Toronto to join in a discussion featuring an exciting and diverse panel of business leaders.

Looking for work with leading Canadian Employers?

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The panel featured five great speakers including Spencer Saunders the President of Art & Science Digital Experience Design, Katherine Dimopoulos the Head of Marketing and Brand Experience at SCENE, Fawn Annan President & Group Publisher IT World Canada & Chair, Canadian Channel Chiefs Council, Ingrid Macintosh the Vice President of Portfolio Advice and Investment Research, TD Bank Group and Michael Kyritsis the VP of People and Values, Bond Brand Loyalty and was moderated by Linda Galipeau, the CEO of Randstad North America.

In this recording, which is introduced by Faith Tull, the Senior Vice President of Human Resources for Randstad Canada, you will hear an in-depth discussion on a number of facets of gender equity, current research on workplace diversity and new insights into the balance that our lives at work and home need to take.

Highlights include discussions on worklife harmony, the importance of verbiage surrounding adaption over accommodation and the importance of finding role models and mentors for anyone seeking to advance their career. 

Introduction Time Signatures:

00:03: Faith Tull, begins her introduction of the panel to the audience at 1 King West, in Toronto, Ontario on November 12, 2014.
4:15: – Faith Tull, introduces the panelists.
5:55: Linda Galipeau, begins her moderation of the panel.
9:00: Q1: Why do we want more diversity in the boardroom – discussion started by Katerhine Dimopoulos.
9:55: Followed up by Ingrid Macintosh.
10:33: Michael Kyritsis speaking about the importance of diversity at the table.
11:25: Q2: Does it matter what role that women take? Very few women in the roles, COO, CIO, CEO, executive women, does it matter? 
13:15: Katherine Dimopolous shares her thoughts on women helping women advance.
14:15: Linda Galipeau introduces research conducted by HP about the “confidence gap”.
16:15: Fawn Annan, speaks on how women and men network differently.
17:05: Ingrid Macintosh speaking on self-selection and the generational shift of women having their own mothers as professional role models.
19:45: Spencer Saunders shares how he has changed his shop culture to be more inclusive.
25:15: Q3: How do men and women network different and how can women network more effectively?
26:00 Fawn Annan, discusses the value of awards and recognition programs for women and organization that spur on diversity.

Join the Women Shaping Business Linkedin Group, and keep the conversation going all year around. Register with the button below.

Join the Women Shaping  Business Linkedin Group

WSB-1

Tags: Womenshapingbiz, gender equity, Women in Tech, Canadian Business

Women Shaping Business: overcoming the ‘’motherhood gap’’

Posted by James Rubec on Thu, Nov 13, 2014 @ 12:06 PM

MAT_leaveAs part of the Women Shaping Business Program, we looked at maternity leave as a resource for families looking to grow while staying in the workforce. We spoke with Shannon Young, Randstad Canada’s Human Resources Manager to learn more about the programs offered by the government and Canadian corporations.

Maternity leave is still a burning issue for women and organizations today. Is a year off putting too much of a strain on organizations? Is taking a year off hindering the chances of women to access senior positions?  In 2012, when Yahoo! appointed Marissa Mayer, six months pregnant, as its new CEO, many viewed the move as a sign that perceptions are evolving, and that employers are starting to believe motherhood and the executive office are in fact compatible. Mrs. Mayer admitted that she was only going to take a few weeks off, showing that the challenges of handling the two are still very real. How do Canadian women today reconcile their desire to raise a family with their professional obligations and aspirations?

Taking the full year off: more and more of a standard for Canadian women

MATIn Canada, each mother is given the opportunity under the law to take a 17 weeks of maternity leave, as well as 35 weeks of parental leave that can be taken either by parent, or adoptive parents.  Companies must provide their employees with that time off, without a penalty to their position, meaning they are guaranteed to have their job when they get back from maternity leave. The Canadian government, through the employment insurance program, offers women and families on leave a little over $500 a week as a maternity leave benefit.

“This is really the cornerstone of Canada’s social family programming,” says Shannon Young, Randstad Canada’s Human Resources Manager. “That time for pair bonding is fundamental to childhood development and the program as it stands facilitates that.”

“What I’ve seen is that more and more women are willing to take the full period of maternity leave off,” explains Young. “Where 10 years ago there was more sense that getting back to work was a priority, these days,  by the time the child is born and families are on leave, they aren’t rushing back to work,” adds Young.

Some industries and companies include additional benefits for women or men who go on maternity leave. These can include pay during periods when they would traditionally be waiting for their firm maternity leave benefit cheque from the government.

“In the healthcare and education sectors,  these sorts of benefits are almost standard. They are a highly effective recruitment and retention tool – when you are planning a family, you want that security,” says Young. 

Going back to work: the challenges and the solutions

But is maternity hindering the chances of women’s progress in the organization? According to our latest Women Shaping Business Survey, 51% of women are worried about their maternity leave having an effect on their ability to move up.

“Things change. You leave the office for a year, you might have a new manager, you might be have a new phone system, you might be working in a different office, your company may have been purchased, everything in a business can change in a year.  That’s something that most women and most corporations have not necessarily thought through when people go on maternity leave,” said Young.

More and more organizations are implementing special programs to ease the transition and remove barriers, for example by pairing female employees on leave with a female coworker to meet and chat about projects and office news, or to assist in winding down before maternity leave and after with the reintegration.

“Organizations have to realize that it isn’t always about the benefits, but also about how well they plan their employees’ return to work. You can’t expect someone to jump back into work after six months or a year off and be back up to 100% in a week.”

Either way, for women or family looking to plan a family, building an understanding of the benefits and programs that are available to you and what you can negotiate for is a great first step. To learn more about the government’s maternity leave visit service Canada’s website, here.

Three tips for getting back to work after a maternity leave:

  1. Plan for a new on boarding: Work with your human resources team and your manager to build a program to help you reintegrate back into your old job or the new one you’ve taken on after your leave. This might be as simple as setting up a meeting to learn new IT processes, or the new phone system, or as complex as a full week of training on a new business line.

  2. Set up meetings with internal business leaders: Before you get into the swing of things, book a few minutes and speak with departmental leaders to learn the current dynamics at play in the office – what the company’s priorities, what are some of the business issues that need to be addressed? This will give you a better picture of how to operate effectively on your return.

  3. Stay in touch while on leave: Be sure to communicate with your manager and your HR department about your plans and date of return. This serves two purposes, one, it helps you stay on top of mind with your team and manager the second it helps you keep on top of some of the activities going on in the workplace.  

To join the discussion on maternity leave and more in the Women Shaping Business Linkedin Group.

Join the Women Shaping  Business Linkedin Group

 

 

Tags: Women Shaping Business, maternity leave, Mentorship, Female leaders, Womenshapingbiz