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Two in Five Canadians Say their Employer does not Support an Active Lifestyle

 

TORONTO, March 26, 2014 – The typical eight hour workday is a long forgotten concept for a vast number of Canadians in today’s workforce. According to the most recent global Workmonitor study by Randstad Canada, the country’s largest staffing, recruitment and HR services company, 40% of Canadians feel like their employer doesn’t support a healthy lifestyle - and even more Canadians (56%) feel like their employer does not support a mentally fit lifestyle by, for example, providing a job coach or a mentor. 

Virtually all Canadians (96%) say that having a good work-life balance is the number one priority for a healthy lifestyle, but having this balance may be far from reality for most. With work demands intensifying as employees try to advance their skills, in combination with increased demands while on the job, heading out to play basketball or run a few laps is becoming increasingly difficult for many workers. What companies may not be considering is how a lack in physical and mental stimulation can affect the end product, as three in four Canadians say they perform better at work when they work-out or play sports regularly.

However, even though workers are staying late and bringing their jobs home on the weekend, they are trying to fit in physical fitness where they can. Seventy-five per cent of workers opt to take the stairs instead of pressing the elevator button throughout the day.  

“It is not a surprise to see so many Canadians taking their health and wellness into their own hands. Improving work-life balance is a common theme for workers from all generations, career levels and industries, and one employers need to make a priority.” says Lauranna Ji, Health and Safety Manager, Randstad Canada. “With many companies working with similar or smaller budgets than last year, a healthy lifestyle for their employees is often overlooked in the pursuit for a better bottom line. However, offering health and wellness incentives, such as a mentorship program, lieu days for extra time worked or a discounted company gym membership, are all ways that companies can show their workers they understand the demands of today’s world of work and are invested in their wellbeing.”

As people continue to pay closer attention to the ingredients that are in prepared and convenience foods, half of Canadian workers do believe that employers are promoting healthy food options for their workers on the job. When it comes to staying mentally fit, employees would like to see more opportunities to speak to a mentor or a job coach, as only 43% of workers say these opportunities are available to them.

When it comes to taking time away for personal reasons, more than three-quarters (79%) of Canadian employees say their employer is supportive - and if time-off is needed to take care of a family member, nearly as many (68%) say their employer would be supportive. The survey also revealed how important the family unit is to Canadians, as nearly 70% of Canadians say they would quit their job if their employer did not let them take time off to take care of a family member.

 

Japanese Employees Feel the Most Overworked Globally


Around the world, Japan has the lowest score (37%) of all the countries when it comes to feeling like they have enough energy to go to work – a direct result of feeling overworked. At the other end of the spectrum, the vast majority of workers in India (94%) say they have enough energy to go to work every day. Those from India had a positive perspective about their employer’s overall, saying their employers are supportive when it comes to promoting a healthy lifestyle (82%) as well as taking time for personal reasons (82%).

The majority of Canadians (89%) say they have enough energy to go to work, and similar scores are seen in the United States (86%) and UK (82%).

“Healthy employees, physically as well as mentally, make for better performers, and thus contribute more to the overall business goals. Employers who promote work-life balance and a healthy lifestyle have a better chance of attracting and retaining productive workers, and are more likely to see their employees committed to driving business results every day.” adds Ji.

 

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About Workmonitor: The Randstad Workmonitor was launched in 2003, and now covers 33 countries around the world, encompassing Europe, Asia Pacific, and the Americas. The Randstad Workmonitor is published four times a year, making both local and global trends in mobility regularly visible over time. The quantitative study is conducted via an online questionnaire among a population aged 18-65, working a minimum of 24 hours a week in a paid job (not self-employed). The minimal sample size is 400 interviews per country, using Survey Sampling International. Research for the 1st wave in 2014 was conducted January 13-30, 2014.

About Randstad Canada:
Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

Skills Gap Still Top of Mind Issue for Canadian Workers in 2014

 

TORONTO, February 25, 2014 – Addressing the skills gap continues to be top of mind with Canadian workers, according to a new study by Ipsos-Reid on behalf of Randstad Canada. In fact, more than nine-in-ten (91.2%) of working Canadians say they feel that the skills shortage/skills gap will continue to be an issue of importance in Canada in 2014.

The Randstad Canada Labour Trends Study 2014, polling 2,076 Canadian employees and managers across the country on their expectations for the coming year, revealed that a lack of skilled trades workers (16.3%), outsourcing of jobs or increases in numbers of international workers (15.2%) and a lack of skilled workers overall (9.9%) are the biggest issues that the country’s organizations are facing in 2014. Those in the Prairies (23.2%) and Alberta (21.6%) are most likely to feel that a lack of skilled trades workers is the single biggest issue in 2014.

"What we are seeing here is reflective of what we’ve seen in the field throughout the past year - organizations in the industrial and technical sectors are struggling to find highly skilled candidates,” says Tom Turpin, President, Randstad Canada. “This is especially true in the West, where oil & gas projects are booming, and in Quebec where we see growth in the IT and aerospace fields".

Skilled trades: the most promising industry for Canadians
Skilled trades is the area in which most Canadians see the greatest job opportunities for 2014. Nearly half (44.7%) see skilled trades as one of the top 3 industries for job opportunities in the coming year, with nearly one in four (23.8%) seeing it as the single best industry for opportunities in the coming year. Healthcare (38.2%), Oil & Gas (33.9%), Technology (26.9%), and Engineering and Construction (25.2%) were also amongst the top five for opportunities based on the opinions of those polled.

Men are more likely than women to believe that Oil & Gas and Engineering and Construction present the best/most opportunities in the coming year; however, women (48.5%) were more likely than men (42.3%) to see skilled trades as the industry offering the best/most job opportunities in 2014.

Industry sectors like Not for Profit, Academia, Arts, Entertainment and Recreation, Consumer Packaged Goods, and Security were the areas that the majority of respondents believed provided the least amount of opportunity in 2014. Additionally, three in ten (28.9%) respondents see trades skills (i.e. plumbing, electrical, etc.) as the most in demand skill set today. This is especially true west of Ontario and East of Quebec, signaling high demand on both coasts for skilled trades workers.


Are organizations doing enough to address the skills gaps?

Whether manager or employee, BCer or Quebecer, Canadian workers believe the responsibility to properly address the issue of the skills gap/shortage lies with companies, governments and educators, and not with hard working Canadians. According to those polled, promotion, compensation, and investment in skills training are critical to properly address the issue of the skills gap/shortage in both the short and long term.

Four out of ten say that companies need to invest more in skills training for their employees (40%), with another 38% saying that educators need to do more to promote to students industries and job roles that are likely to lead to careers addressing the skills shortage/gap.

One in three (32.9%) think that governments need to invest more in skills training for unemployed and underemployed workers, with one-quarter (25.7%) also believing governments need to provide better incentives for workers to move into positions that address the skills shortage/gap.

Young workers (18-34) are more likely to expect companies to provide better financial incentives (41.4%), while mature workers (55+) are especially critical of the role that educators have played in addressing the issue and promoting industries and job roles to students (44.9%), and incentivizing students to pursue these types of careers (33.7%). Women are more likely to feel that governments can have a large impact in the issue when compared to men, while men see the responsibility sitting with companies more so than women.

 

Lack of education, negative perceptions widening the gap

According to the study, Canadian workers believe that education and perception are core reasons that have led to today’s skills shortage. Four in five (79%) survey respondents stated they feel a lack of knowledge in skilled trades has led to less Canadians considering them a career option, while more than three-quarters (76.6%) felt that a perception of skilled trade work being less respected and more old fashioned in comparison to ‘white collar’ work has led to less interest for Canadians desiring these types of roles. 

Ontarians (69.4%) most frequently stated that they experienced pressure by family to pursue more traditional ‘white collar’ careers when in school, while Quebecers experienced the least amount of familial intervention (52.2%).

 

Future opportunities

More than one-third of those polled said that they would consider pursuing a career in skilled trades if there were good immediate and long term job prospects (37%), or if they presented better long-term job security than other fields (34.8%). Additionally, nearly one-third (31.8%) say that training programs readily available to help transition or begin in the field would entice them to pursue a career in skilled trades.

More than one-quarter of Quebecers (25.8%) and Canadians under the age of 35 (25.5%) said they would consider entering a skilled trade if they required less and/or lower cost pre-work education. Only one in six Canadians (16.7%) would not for any reason consider a career in skilled trades, including one in five women (20.6%).

"There is still a lot to be done to change perceived negative perceptions around skilled trades. Everyone, from organizations to schools, governments and placement agencies like us, need to do more to promote careers in skilled trades,” says Turpin. As companies use more sophisticated equipment and technologies, they need workers with specialized technical skills - and this translates into higher salaries. The opportunities are there for young Canadians who are open to a different academic and career path, and for organizations who are willing to invest in training and developing them through apprenticeships".   

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Survey Methodology: These are the results of a survey conducted by Ipsos-Reid Public Affairs on behalf of Randstad Canada. A total sample of 2,076 employed Canadians was interviewed via Ipsos’ online panel, including n= 800 managers/employers and n= 1,276 generally employed Canadians. The survey was conducted between December 20th and 29th, 2013. The survey is considered accurate to +/- 2.5 percentage points of all employed Canadians, +/-4 percentage points of all Canadians in a managerial role and +/-3.1 percentage points of all Canadians working in a non-managerial role.

 

About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

Date

February 25, 2014

More information

James Rubec
Marie-Noelle Morency

Telephone

416.962.9578 x2512
514.350.5309 x233

 

Canadian Workers Cautiously Optimistic About Job Market, Economy in 2014

 

TORONTO, January 23, 2014 – While 2013 ended on a down note, with the loss of 48,000 jobs across Canada in December, a new study conducted by Ipsos-Reid on behalf of Randstad Canada shows that Canadian workers are entering 2014 with a cautiously optimistic outlook for the job market and economy overall this year.

The Randstad Canada Labour Trends Study 2014, polling 2,076 Canadian employees and managers across the country on their expectations for the coming year, revealed that three-in-ten respondents (30%) said they feel more confident in the strength of the Canadian economy heading into 2014 than they were entering 2013, while another 50% said they felt about the same amount of confidence heading into this year as they did last. Those in Alberta (35%) and British Columbia (32%) were the most confident in the strength of the Canadian economy heading into 2014, while those in Quebec (27%) and Atlantic Canada (22%) were the least.

 

Canadians Split About Confidence in the Job Market

While nearly half (48%) of the 2,076 Canadians polled said they feel about the same amount of confidence in the job market in 2014 as they did in 2013, those that do feel differently than last year are decidedly split. While one-quarter (25%) of respondents felt more confident in the job market heading into this year, slightly more (27%) said they actually feel less confident this year than they did at the beginning of last year.

Respondents working in a managerial or executive position are significantly more confident (30.3%) than their below-manager counterparts (19.2%). Younger workers (under the age of 35) are also much more confident in the job market this year (30.5%) than those who are well into their careers (35-54 - 21.9%).

As with expectations for the strength of the economy, those living in Western Canada (British Columbia and Alberta) are substantially more confident in the job market this year (30.4% and 31.3% respectively) than those on the East Coast and in Quebec (18.1% and 23.3% respectively). In fact, those living in Atlantic Canada (33.8%) and Ontario (31.9%) are the most likely to feel less confident in the job market in 2014 than they were in 2013.

“While 2013 may not stand out in anyone’s mind as a banner year for the Canadian job market or the economy overall, it is encouraging to see even cautious optimism from both employees and employers about this year’s prospects on both fronts,” says Tom Turpin, President, Randstad Canada.

 

One-Third of Canadians Will Look for a New Job in 2014

Of those polled, one-third (33%) said they expect it will be more difficult to find a new job in 2014 than it was in 2013, with only one-in-five (20%) expecting it be an easier task than last year. Even so, three-in-ten (31%) currently employed Canadians say they are likely to personally look for a new job in 2014.

Women in particular are more concerned with ease of mobility between jobs this year – while nearly half feel that their prospects of finding a new job will be about the same as 2013, almost two-in–five (38%) feel it will be more difficult for job seekers to find a new job this year than it was last.

Regionally, Albertans are the most confident when it comes to finding new jobs, with one-third feeling it will be easier to do so in 2014 than it was in 2013. Ontarians are the most pessimistic in Canada, with more than 40% anticipating finding a new job in 2014 will be more difficult than last year.

Younger workers (under 35) are much more likely to look for a new job in 2014 – nearly half (46.5%) intend to look this year, compared to three-in-ten (31%) overall. Workers in Ontario (35%), Alberta (33%) and BC (33%) are the most likely to look for a new job in 2014, while those in Quebec (24%) are the least likely.

 

A Better Bottom-Line Expected in 2014 – for Companies and Employees Alike

Canadians are especially optimistic when it comes to their organizations’ performance in the coming year. Nearly nine-in-ten (89%) of those polled expect their company/employer to perform better (37%) or about the same (52%) financially this year when compared to 2013, with only 11% anticipating a worse year financially in 2014. Those in managerial and executive positions (45%) are much more likely to expect their organization’s to perform better financially in 2014 than employees (29%).

As Canadians expect their companies to perform better, they also expect to receive a bigger paycheck themselves. More than half (51%) of those polled said they expect to receive a raise in 2014, with those in Quebec (58%) and Alberta (57%) feeling much more confident in receiving a salary increase than those in Ontario (46%) or British Columbia (48%).

Both employers and employees expect to ask more of each other in 2014

Canadian employers (managers and executives) say that, in order for them to contribute to their organization’s success in 2014, their employees need to expect greater demands on productivity (65%), greater expectations for better results with budgets similar to or below 2013 levels (64%) and greater expectations for new tasks as a part of their everyday roles (61%). Those in Atlantic Canada (77%) and Alberta (72%) especially expect increased productivity by their employees to be in greater demand in the coming year.

While managers and executives will expect more from their employees in 2014, workers are also expecting employers to bring more to the table this year. Those polled said that, in order to contribute to their employees’ job satisfaction, employers will need to provide better performance incentives and financial rewards (45%), better work-life balance (42%), and better training and development opportunities for employees (39%) in 2014.

‘’What these results tell us is that both employees and managers keep a watchful eye on the market’s progress this year, and how it will contribute to better their professional and personal lives,” says Turpin. “Given the opportunities and challenges they perceive, it will be critical for job seekers, employees, and employers to set clear expectations on their needs and requirements in order to foster productivity, growth and engagement in Canadian workplaces.’’

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Survey Methodology: These are the results of a survey conducted by Ipsos-Reid Public Affairs on behalf of Randstad Canada. A total sample of 2,076 employed Canadians was interviewed via Ipsos’ online panel, including n= 800 managers/employers and n= 1,276 generally employed Canadians. The survey was conducted between December 20th and 29th, 2013. The survey is considered accurate to +/- 2.5 percentage points of all employed Canadians, +/-4 percentage points of all Canadians in a managerial role and +/-3.1 percentage points of all Canadians working in a non-managerial role.

 

About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

Survey Says: Canadians Expect Employers to Foot the Bill for Skills Training

 

TORONTO, November 26, 2013:  Canada’s skills gap was a major element of the last Federal budget, with the launch of programs such as the Canada Job Grant that share the cost of training and upgrading workforce skills with employers. But when it comes to an up-to-date skill set, who is responsible – the employer or the employee?

According to the most recent WorkMonitor study by Randstad, the country’s largest human resources and staffing company, 91 per cent of Canadian workers hold the employer responsible for ensuring the skills and competences of employees correspond with job requirements.

“This may in part be related to the fact that the study also revealed that more than eight in ten Canadian workers feel that the demands on employees are higher than five years ago,” said Tom Turpin, President, Randstad Canada.

This has significant implications for Canada’s skills shortage, as employed Canadians would be less likely to pursue advanced training on their own.

“Canadians already have the highest rate of tertiary college education in the world,” says Turpin, citing a recent OECD report evaluating global education. “After years in school, for many there is an expectation that they should be able to get a good job and a strong career. That’s simply an unrealistic impression in many professions.”

However, while Canadians workers are among the most likely to expect their employers to ensure their skills and competences are maintained, they are also amongst the least likely in the world to believe that formal education will become more important in their position, with only 57% agreeing.

“Education and training is a serious investment for either a company or an individual.  It isn’t an easy thing for a job seeker or worker to do on their own, but many professions require it,” says Turpin, speaking about retraining requirements for technologies professions, or further advancement required for financial designations like a CPA. “Canadians who are looking for opportunities for training within their workplace, or through their employer, need to start that discussion today.”

Implementation of programs like the Canada Job Grant can take time, and the Job Grant program announced earlier this year won’t be instituted fully instituted until 2017. However, the advantages of training and promoting from within are very real.

“When you train someone and bring them up through the ranks it can be beneficial to your employer brand. It can also be a very beneficial cost savings, removing the need to engage in a more complex hiring process, or train new employees on your internal processes,” said Turpin.

 To ensure they are bridging the skills gap accordingly, employers need to evaluate what processes or strategies will help them meet their long term hiring and skills management goals. At the same time, Canadian job seekers and workers need to plan for ongoing skills development to both ensure they are prepared to meet the requirements of future job opportunities, as well as to advance within the companies they currently work for.

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About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

 

Administrative Professionals and Managers Adjust to New Era of Business Support: Study

 
Workers  and managers agree on scope of role, but differ on fair compensation
TORONTO, November 14, 2013:  Has business support become more or less essential in today's working environment, where almost everyone has their own computer, produces their own documents and is connected 24/7 via mobile communications? Has the role changed and adapted to the realities of the modern organization? 

According to a recent study seeking the opinion of both administrative personnel and mangers alike, conducted by Ipsos Reid on behalf of Randstad Canada, the answer is clear. Eighty eight per cent of those working in an administrative support role feel that admin professionals are more vital to an organization's success today than in the past, with 85 per cent of managers feeling the same. In fact, 86 per cent of administrative support professionals feel that their role will become even more vital in the future, with 82 per cent of business decision makers in agreement.

However, if the position of administrative assistant summons up a stereotypical image of only secretarial duties, think again. Nearly nine in ten (86 per cent) of those working in administrative roles surveyed reported identifiable changes over the course of their careers, with nearly half agreeing that their responsibilities had expanded, and more is expected of them in their day-to-day activities.

"The managers participating in the survey agreed with the fact that administrative support role has broadened, today including many non-traditional administrative functions as expected parts of the day-to-day job," said Tom Turpin, President, Randstad Canada. "It is encouraging to see that both those in the role and those overseeing them share similar perspectives – a clear sign that the expanded scope and responsibilities taken on by these critical workers is being recognized."

So how has the role of administrative support expanded? The study indicated that fifty seven per cent overall (including 62 per cent of women) report they are today asked to participate in customer service support, and 46 per cent say they are responsible for financial tasks such as purchasing, invoicing and accounting. One third (33 per cent) said they are also responsible for IT activities, with 39 per cent of males in an administrative role citing IT responsibilities.  Sales and marketing activities are also being performed by 20 per cent of administrative support workers, and more frequently by those under the age of 35 (27 per cent).

Secretarial duties are still expected of 45 per cent of administrative support professionals, with nearly twice as many females (57 per cent) performing these tasks as males (30 per cent). Forty one per cent perform office and executive management tasks, such as scheduling and reception duties.

"Technology has freed up administrative personnel to perform more independent tasks, rather than directly supporting and being reliant on the work of others," said Tom Turpin.  "However, with traditional secretarial duties still expected in many cases, this creates a balancing act between the immediate demands of others and these new duties."

Turpin adds that this has implications for job descriptions and candidates seeking these positions, with characteristics such as adaptability and multi-tasking being key attributes.

Greatly Contrasting Views on Compensation

While administrative support workers and managers agree that demands on these professionals are increasing, they do differ greatly when it comes to the question of compensation. Seventy two per cent of managers believe that administrative support professionals are better compensated today than in the past, and that compensation is adequate for the tasks at hand.  However, only 57 per cent of administrative support professionals stated that compensation is better today than in the past, and more than half (53 per cent) believe that compensation is for professionals is not at the appropriate level for the numbers and type of tasks expected today.

"Given that managers acknowledge the increased demands on administrative personnel, it is surprising to see that their opinions regarding compensation are so different, and signals that business decision makers may need to review policies to attract and retain valued employees in these increasingly critical roles," added Tom Turpin.

Both administrative professionals and business decision makers indicate that the typical range of compensation for administrative support staff is between $30,000 and $50,000 annually (56 per cent), a range unlikely to change dramatically over the next year as managers indicate that the majority of organizational budgets for administrative support have remained static this year (55 per cent).  Just over one quarter (26 per cent) have increased budgets this year, and one in five (19 per cent) have reduced budgets assigned to administrative support staff.

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About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca.

These are the results of a poll conducted between September 19th to 24th, 2013 by Ipsos Reid on behalf of Randstad.  A total sample of 500 employed Canadians (n=250 working in an administrative role and n=250 working in a business decision-making position) was surveyed online.  The poll is considered accurate to +/- 7.1 percentage points had all Canadian working in an administrative or business-decision making position been surveyed. 

More information

James Rubec

416.962.9578 x2512

Canada’s Female Leaders Acknowledge the Last Taboos Impacting Workplace Progress: Study

 

Image, managing work and family, and the gender of the boss prove to greatly influence promotions and advancements for women, but progress being made in corporate Canada

TORONTO, October 15, 2013 – Much has been said about Canada’s progressive business environment removing the glass ceiling for women in the workplace. Yet a recent study among 501 female business leaders, conducted by Ipsos-Reid on behalf of Randstad Canada, suggests that many of the key inhibitors to female progression are not easily identifiable factors that can be addressed by corporate policies or workplace procedures, because wider societal perceptions of women and the complexities of male and female interactions are at play.

Personal Appearance Affects Promotion

When asked if personal image, including appearance, can impact career progression,

90 per cent of respondents said that they believe that overall image, including looks, have a substantial impact on a woman's career progression, while only 37 per cent believe image can have the same effect on a man's career.

“While this is a sensitive issue, marked differences in opinion between those women over 55 and those under 35 suggest that there may be progress underway,” said Gina Ibghy, Chief People Officer, Randstad Canada, adding that while 55 per cent of older workers are the most likely to say that image plays a very large factor in a women's career, only 42 per cent of younger women say the same. In fact, 33 per cent of those respondents under the age of 35 feel image plays no factor at all.

Addressing another sensitive topic, the Randstad study also asked Canada’s female business leaders if having a male or female boss can affect career progression. Based on the responses, Canadian women are divided in their opinions, with half stating that the gender of a superior does not impact a woman's chance to obtain a managerial or executive position and half say that it does.  Interestingly, those stating that gender plays a role feel that a female boss is more likely to inhibit their progression than a male superior.

“We are surprised by this outcome in the study,” said Gina Ibghy.  “Because it is a common perception that women support other women in the workplace and another aspect of the study identified that mentorship and advocate programs for women by women are considered important for career advancement.”

Respondents Say Women Are Better Leaders Than Men

The study also investigated another hot topic of debate - the question of whether men or women make better leaders. Sixty-five percent of the respondents say that women are better leaders, citing enhanced communication, empathy, flexibility and organizational skills as contributing to this belief.  But 77 per cent say that women have to work longer hours and harder than a male counterpart to attain these positions.

When asked about more traditional workplace challenges three in five women say managing work and family as the most challenging obstacle that women face, at 61 per cent reflecting a slight increase from 60 per cent when asked the same question a year ago. Taking this question a step further, when asked if they think that companies take women’s personal commitments outside work into consideration, almost half at 49 per cent, say that companies fear absences among female employees due to family commitments and that this has impact on career progression.  Women also cite the potential for maternity leave as a large "fear factor", with 24 per cent having experienced this as an impediment to promotion.

“There are still vast differences in the way women are treated in corporate Canada, and it isn’t just about compensation and access to the corner office. Less measurable, but no less important factors restricting advancement and being provided chances to make business critical decisions are at play," said Gina Ibghy.  "It's against that backdrop that we conducted the research and developed the Women Shaping Business campaign.  By acknowledging these issues still exist, we aspire to start to affect positive change for women in the Canadian workplace.”

Randstad Canada recently launched its second annual Women Shaping Business campaign with a call for nominations of women leaders who are impacting their organizations and their communities. Canadians can nominate by sharing stories of female leaders they admire at www.womenshapingbusiness.com.

“There is no doubt that women are strong leaders.  Our goal is to encourage executives, employees and all Canadians to have an open discussion about the last workplace taboos that create obstacles for female executives,” added Gina Ibghy.

So what does help women advance in the workplace? The study respondents say that it is those women leaders themselves who are demanding equal opportunities that continue to be the biggest influence on making executive positions more obtainable for women.

Other interesting insights from the Women Shaping Business study include:

  • Women continue to see a substantial perceived divide between men and women when it comes to salary (78 per cent), promotions (72 per cent), getting the best tasks and projects (70 per cent), influencing important decisions (67 per cent), travel opportunities (57 per cent.)
  • More flexible working arrangements continues to be the area which respondents feel an improvement would help benefit the ability for females to obtain managerial/executive positions at 60 per cent, a slight decline from 2012.
  • Training and Development Programs for Women are becoming a greater priority, with a 7per cent increase overall in the past year.
  • At 16 per cent, there has been no gain in the number of respondents that have been provided with a sponsor/mentor since 2012 and substantially fewer respondents from Quebec have been provided with a mentor/sponsor year over year. One in five women in business in Ontario and BC have a sponsor/mentor.
  • As in 2012, 52 per cent expect to see more women coming into management roles, although Quebec respondents are substantially more optimistic about the prospects for more women in managerial/executive this year than last, with a 6per cent increase in expectations  and younger respondents (under 34) are slightly more optimistic than those 35 and above/
  • 65 per cent  overall agree that significant efforts have been made in encouraging greater female managerial/executive representation in non-traditional fields such as oil and gas, IT and construction, although there are regional differences with 72 per cent of Ontario respondents agreeing , while only 56 per cent of Quebecers feel significant efforts have been made in these sectors

Full results from the study are available online at www.womenshapingbusiness.com.

 

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Survey Methodology:  These are some of the findings from an Ipsos Reid survey conducted between August 9 and 13, 2013, on behalf of Randstad Canada. A sample of 501 women who held managerial/executive roles in their organization were interviewed online. Individuals were disqualified if they did not meet management criteria. Weighting was then employed to balance regional composition according to Census data and to provide results intended to approximate the sample universe. The precision of Ipsos online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll is accurate to within +/- 4.5 percentage points had all Canadian women in management positions been polled. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error, and measurement error.

About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

More information

James Rubec
Marie-Noelle Morency

Telephone

416.962.9578 x2512
514.350.5309 x233


What does the future hold for business women in the Canadian workplace?

 

Randstad Canada launches the second edition of its Women Shaping Business Program

TORONTO, October 7, 2013 - Randstad Canada today launched the second edition of its Women Shaping Business Program, aimed at exploring the challenges and opportunities for today’s Canadian women in the workplace.

A key element of the program, Randstad Canada has once again conducted a nationwide survey in collaboration with Ipsos Reid, polling over 500 female executives and managers. The survey asked women how they feel the country has progressed toward more equal workplaces, and about the opportunities and challenges that exist in the country’s corporate culture. Preliminary results from the survey show that equality between men and women in the workplace has progressed, but corporate Canada still has a long way to go.

"While we see in the research that women feel there will be more opportunities for them to obtain managerial and executive positions, some challenges remain, whether related to compensation, work-life balance, or mentorship. The study provides us with a valuable opportunity to take a hard look at the current perceptions of Canada's female executives, examine areas where progress still needs to be made, and reflect ont how today’s organizations can start to affect change", says Gina Ibghy, Chief People Officer, Randstad Canada. 

In addition to the survey, Randstad Canada had also launched the Women Shaping Business Award, designed to recognize women leaders who are impacting workplaces and communities around the country. Canadians are asked to share stories of female leaders who have impacted their businesses and communities. One women nominated will be awarded as 2013’s Women Shaping Business, with the nominee of the winner being awarded $10,000 to donate to a charity of their choosing. 

More information on the Award nomination process can be found at the new campaign site www.womenshapingbusiness.com.


The full report based on the findings of the study will be released on October 15, and can be found on www.womenshapingbusiness.com, and the 2012 report is currently available for download. The site includes real stories about women leaders, research on the state of female employment in regions Canada, and articles about the differences in legislation and the availability of child care. 

‘’We want executives, employees and all Canadians to have an open discussion about the place of business women in the Canadian workplace. In order to attract the top talent and truly promote gender diversity in more senior roles, it will be important for Canadian employers to support, develop and promote women leaders, and demonstrate how their career opportunities are as attractive for women as they are to men”, says Ibghy. 

You can also find our campaign on Twitter with the hashtag #womenshapingbiz. 

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About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

Labour Day job search boost: 7 ways to make yourself more employable

 

TORONTO, September 4, 2013 – Labour Day marks the end of summer holidays, and for those currently in search of a job, it is an opportunity to jumpstart your job search. As September is a strong period for hiring, and always a time of renewal, Randstad Canada, the country's leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services, shares 7 ways for job seekers to build up their own personal brand and make themselves more employable.  

Jan Hein Bax, President, Randstad Canada says this period of year can provide great opportunities to give your job search a much needed boost.  “If you’ve been looking for work and you’re not getting many interviews or job offers, you need to re-evaluate your strategy and do more to stand out,’’ he says.

“Today, paying attention to your online presence and image is essential in building up a strong personal brand. But building your employee profile also means nurturing your professional relationships, enhancing your skills and industry knowledge, and setting clear career goals,” adds Bax.

Bax offers the following ways to help jobseekers make connections, get motivated and get closer to landing a new job.

1-    Network, network, network: Networking is still one of the best ways to land a new job, and it can happen anywhere. We meet people every day. Talk to a variety of people and exchange contact information. Making those meetings important and following up with the people you meet is imperative to translating introductions into job offers. If you meet a series of people at an event and you got their business cards, consider writing their names down in a list and ensuring you follow up with that list within two or three days of your first meeting. Connect with them on Twitter and Linkedin. Following up with these people and building a strong rapport will develop a relationship and that relationship can turn into real work.

2-    Make a plan: What do you want to be doing next year, three years and five years down the line? How are you going to get there? Write your plan down and begin to shape your life, this exercise will help give you the foresight to answer some interesting questions in interviews and give you a path to follow in your career progression.

3-    Learn a new skill: Continued learning and evidence of it is an incredible asset. Showing that you are pushing your boundaries and can learn shows an employer that you are a flexible growing asset that will increase in value with time.

4-    Refresh your information: If you are applying to jobs and not getting very much response, put yourself in an employer’s shoes and look at your resume. How does it stack up in comparison to your competition? If you don’t know, consider asking for help from a local resource, a recruiter or a friend in your industry. Update your resume with new experience, skills, or information; update your cover letter format to reflect any changes or to include new examples of your accomplishments and goals.​ And don’t forget to update the biographical information on your social networks! These resources are potential job-search gold mines, make sure your online pages are up to date!

5-    Research: Write down everything you know about your industry. Compiling all of the knowledge you have about the industry you are applying for will bring your work history and experience to the front of your mind. Consider thinking about where and how you learned what you learned as well. Read and contribute to group discussions related to your field on Linkedin, and connect to influencers in your industry on Twitter to be on top of trends and news.

6-    Share your story: Your resume and the interview process need to be about differentiating yourself from other candidates. Connecting your work history, your education and your personal goals and endeavours will help produce a full picture of who you are and why you want to work with a specific company. Showing how your ambitions align with a business’s can help get you noticed.

7-    Get involved in your community: Getting involved in your community will allow you to enhance your profile, put you on more people’s radar and it could ultimately open doors. Make sure you choose groups or associations that reflect your values and that emphasize your professional skills.  

 

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About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

Experience or Education? What Gets You Hired

 

Experience or education? Canadians place high value in experience and temporary work

TORONTO, July 4, 2013 – Findings from Randstad's latest Global Workmonitor, surveying employees in 32 countries around the world, reveal that most Canadians believe experience weighs harder than education in finding a suitable job.

When asked to rate their agreement on the statement “I believe experience weighs harder than education in finding a suitable job,”  84% of Canadians agreed or strongly agreed. Respondents from countries around the world share the same views, especially China (92%), the UK (91%) and India (91%).

“Hiring requirements vary widely depending on field or industry, but the perception is that experience will compensate for for the lack of a degree or diploma. In today’s diversified marketplace, job seekers need to thoroughly research the companies they want to work for, the roles they are targeting, in order to better understand what combination of experience and qualifications is needed to effectively promote themselves and where they need to fill in the gaps.,’’ says Jan Hein Bax, President, Randstad Canada.

Temporary work viewed as a stepping stone

The importance of gaining experience also reflect in job seekers’ perception of temporary work, as 82% of Canadians believe temporary work can be a stepping stone to a permanent job.

“There were many misconceptions related to temporary work; people used to think that you could only find low-paying jobs, or that it would hurt your prospects of getting hired for the long run,” explained Bax.

But the labour market has rapidly evolved, with more Canadian workers choosing to include Temporary Work as part of their career paths.

“Temporary work offers flexibility and an opportunity to gain valuable exposure in the workforce. You can demonstrate your value to an employer, discover new fields of interest, and get a break in a desirable industry,’’ says Jan Hein Bax, President, Randstad Canada.

 

Recent Canadian labour trendshave also impacted Canadians’ opinions on job security and work tenure. According to the survey, 58% of the Canadians do not believe in job security, a percentage even higher in the US (71%). Not surprisingly, in countries where the economic situation is problematic like Greece (94%), Hungary (93%) and Spain (91%) people agreed most with the statement “In my country there is no such thing as ‘job security’ “.

Furthermore, 89% of Canadians think it is better to have a temporary job than no job at all. Almost all employees across the world agreed, the lowest percentage shows India at 76% and highest Spain (94%).


“In the context of economic uncertainty, many employers rely on a flexible workforce to remain competitive in the market. For talented candidates, temporary work is a good way to stay employed while keeping their skills sharp,’’ adds Bax.

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About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

The Randstad Workmonitor

The Randstad Workmonitor was launched in 2003, and now covers 32 countries around the world, encompassing Europe, Asia Pacific, and the Americas. The Randstad Workmonitor is published four times a year, making both local and global trends in mobility regularly visible over time.

The quantitative study is conducted via an online questionnaire among a population aged 18-65, working a minimum of 24 hours a week in a paid job (not self-employed). The minimal sample size is 400 interviews per country, using Survey Sampling International. The 2nd wave of 2013 was conducted between 18 April and 3 May 2013.

To read more about this survey, please see our previous blog post on youth employment versus older work employment here, or our most recent blog post on the value of experience over education here. 

For more information please contact

 

James Rubec at 416.962.9578 x2512

 

or Marie-Noelle Morency at 514.350.5309 x233

 

 

 

 

 

 

Younger and older workers - different career stages, similar challenges

 

TORONTO, June 25, 2013 – Findings from Randstad's latest Global Workmonitor, surveying employees in 32 countries around the world, reveal that most Canadians believe it is harder for both younger and older workers to find a suitable job.

When asked to rate their agreement on the statement “I believe it is hard for young people (aged 25 or younger) to find suitable job,” 86% of respondents agreed or agreed strongly. Similarly to the statement “I believe it is hard for older people (aged 55 or older) to find a suitable job,” 89% of the respondents agreed or strongly agree, with only 2% of respondents strongly disagreeing.

The same question asked in the United States saw less pessimism when it came to young people, with only 64% of respondents agreeing with the statement. While for older workers agreement was similar with 87%.

Paired with these numbers the respondents felt that both younger and older workers would be willing to accept work below their education levels - with 86% agreeing that younger works would do so, and 77% agreeing that older workers would too. In the US, these figures are even more in the affirmative, with 90% of respondents agreeing that young people would accept such work, and 83% for older workers.

“In an increasingly competitive market, companies may be hesitant to make the larger investments in more experienced workers; or smaller investments in those who are untested. But as the labour market faces impending skills shortages, companies need to invest in training the new generation of workers to replace those skilled workers that will soon leave. They also need experienced workers who can act as mentors and help facilitate the integration of young employees,” says Jan Hein Bax, President, Randstad Canada.

Canadians believe in a diversified workplace

While people believe it is hard for both young and old people to find suitable jobs, they also think organizations should hire younger and older talent. 78% of those Canadians asked think it is good for their company to actively recruit young people, while 66% think it is good to recruit older people. And there could be good news on the horizon for both age groups, as the last Statistics Canada Labour Force study for May 2013 indicated a rise in employment in both the under 25s and over 55s. 

“As shown in the results of the Workmonitor survey, workers are embracing a more diversified workforce and are seeing the benefits of building a workplace with multiple generations. Older workers bring stability and a deep knowledge of their field, which can be instrumental in critical decision making. On the other hand, younger workers easily adapt to change and have a fresh outlook on the latest technology and industry trends that can lead to innovation in processes and product development. Organizations definitely benefit from both the invaluable experience of older workers and the creative thinking of the younger workforce,” adds Bax.

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About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

The Randstad Workmonitor

The Randstad Workmonitor was launched in 2003, and now covers 32 countries around the world, encompassing Europe, Asia Pacific, and the Americas. The Randstad Workmonitor is published four times a year, making both local and global trends in mobility regularly visible over time. 

You can download a copy of the quarterly survey here.

The quantitative study is conducted via an online questionnaire among a population aged 18-65, working a minimum of 24 hours a week in a paid job (not self-employed). The minimal sample size is 400 interviews per country, using Survey Sampling International. The 2nd wave of 2013 was conducted between 18 April and 3 May 2013.

For younger or older workers who need advice on their resumes, turn to our blog post on how to make the most of the experience you have.

For more information please contact

James Rubec at 416.962.9578 x2512

or Marie-Noelle Morency at 514.350.5309 x233

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