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Labour Day job search boost: 7 ways to make yourself more employable

 

TORONTO, September 4, 2013 – Labour Day marks the end of summer holidays, and for those currently in search of a job, it is an opportunity to jumpstart your job search. As September is a strong period for hiring, and always a time of renewal, Randstad Canada, the country's leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services, shares 7 ways for job seekers to build up their own personal brand and make themselves more employable.  

Jan Hein Bax, President, Randstad Canada says this period of year can provide great opportunities to give your job search a much needed boost.  “If you’ve been looking for work and you’re not getting many interviews or job offers, you need to re-evaluate your strategy and do more to stand out,’’ he says.

“Today, paying attention to your online presence and image is essential in building up a strong personal brand. But building your employee profile also means nurturing your professional relationships, enhancing your skills and industry knowledge, and setting clear career goals,” adds Bax.

Bax offers the following ways to help jobseekers make connections, get motivated and get closer to landing a new job.

1-    Network, network, network: Networking is still one of the best ways to land a new job, and it can happen anywhere. We meet people every day. Talk to a variety of people and exchange contact information. Making those meetings important and following up with the people you meet is imperative to translating introductions into job offers. If you meet a series of people at an event and you got their business cards, consider writing their names down in a list and ensuring you follow up with that list within two or three days of your first meeting. Connect with them on Twitter and Linkedin. Following up with these people and building a strong rapport will develop a relationship and that relationship can turn into real work.

2-    Make a plan: What do you want to be doing next year, three years and five years down the line? How are you going to get there? Write your plan down and begin to shape your life, this exercise will help give you the foresight to answer some interesting questions in interviews and give you a path to follow in your career progression.

3-    Learn a new skill: Continued learning and evidence of it is an incredible asset. Showing that you are pushing your boundaries and can learn shows an employer that you are a flexible growing asset that will increase in value with time.

4-    Refresh your information: If you are applying to jobs and not getting very much response, put yourself in an employer’s shoes and look at your resume. How does it stack up in comparison to your competition? If you don’t know, consider asking for help from a local resource, a recruiter or a friend in your industry. Update your resume with new experience, skills, or information; update your cover letter format to reflect any changes or to include new examples of your accomplishments and goals.​ And don’t forget to update the biographical information on your social networks! These resources are potential job-search gold mines, make sure your online pages are up to date!

5-    Research: Write down everything you know about your industry. Compiling all of the knowledge you have about the industry you are applying for will bring your work history and experience to the front of your mind. Consider thinking about where and how you learned what you learned as well. Read and contribute to group discussions related to your field on Linkedin, and connect to influencers in your industry on Twitter to be on top of trends and news.

6-    Share your story: Your resume and the interview process need to be about differentiating yourself from other candidates. Connecting your work history, your education and your personal goals and endeavours will help produce a full picture of who you are and why you want to work with a specific company. Showing how your ambitions align with a business’s can help get you noticed.

7-    Get involved in your community: Getting involved in your community will allow you to enhance your profile, put you on more people’s radar and it could ultimately open doors. Make sure you choose groups or associations that reflect your values and that emphasize your professional skills.  

 

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About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

Experience or Education? What Gets You Hired

 

Experience or education? Canadians place high value in experience and temporary work

TORONTO, July 4, 2013 – Findings from Randstad's latest Global Workmonitor, surveying employees in 32 countries around the world, reveal that most Canadians believe experience weighs harder than education in finding a suitable job.

When asked to rate their agreement on the statement “I believe experience weighs harder than education in finding a suitable job,”  84% of Canadians agreed or strongly agreed. Respondents from countries around the world share the same views, especially China (92%), the UK (91%) and India (91%).

“Hiring requirements vary widely depending on field or industry, but the perception is that experience will compensate for for the lack of a degree or diploma. In today’s diversified marketplace, job seekers need to thoroughly research the companies they want to work for, the roles they are targeting, in order to better understand what combination of experience and qualifications is needed to effectively promote themselves and where they need to fill in the gaps.,’’ says Jan Hein Bax, President, Randstad Canada.

Temporary work viewed as a stepping stone

The importance of gaining experience also reflect in job seekers’ perception of temporary work, as 82% of Canadians believe temporary work can be a stepping stone to a permanent job.

“There were many misconceptions related to temporary work; people used to think that you could only find low-paying jobs, or that it would hurt your prospects of getting hired for the long run,” explained Bax.

But the labour market has rapidly evolved, with more Canadian workers choosing to include Temporary Work as part of their career paths.

“Temporary work offers flexibility and an opportunity to gain valuable exposure in the workforce. You can demonstrate your value to an employer, discover new fields of interest, and get a break in a desirable industry,’’ says Jan Hein Bax, President, Randstad Canada.

 

Recent Canadian labour trendshave also impacted Canadians’ opinions on job security and work tenure. According to the survey, 58% of the Canadians do not believe in job security, a percentage even higher in the US (71%). Not surprisingly, in countries where the economic situation is problematic like Greece (94%), Hungary (93%) and Spain (91%) people agreed most with the statement “In my country there is no such thing as ‘job security’ “.

Furthermore, 89% of Canadians think it is better to have a temporary job than no job at all. Almost all employees across the world agreed, the lowest percentage shows India at 76% and highest Spain (94%).


“In the context of economic uncertainty, many employers rely on a flexible workforce to remain competitive in the market. For talented candidates, temporary work is a good way to stay employed while keeping their skills sharp,’’ adds Bax.

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About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

The Randstad Workmonitor

The Randstad Workmonitor was launched in 2003, and now covers 32 countries around the world, encompassing Europe, Asia Pacific, and the Americas. The Randstad Workmonitor is published four times a year, making both local and global trends in mobility regularly visible over time.

The quantitative study is conducted via an online questionnaire among a population aged 18-65, working a minimum of 24 hours a week in a paid job (not self-employed). The minimal sample size is 400 interviews per country, using Survey Sampling International. The 2nd wave of 2013 was conducted between 18 April and 3 May 2013.

To read more about this survey, please see our previous blog post on youth employment versus older work employment here, or our most recent blog post on the value of experience over education here. 

For more information please contact

 

James Rubec at 416.962.9578 x2512

 

or Marie-Noelle Morency at 514.350.5309 x233

 

 

 

 

 

 

Younger and older workers - different career stages, similar challenges

 

TORONTO, June 25, 2013 – Findings from Randstad's latest Global Workmonitor, surveying employees in 32 countries around the world, reveal that most Canadians believe it is harder for both younger and older workers to find a suitable job.

When asked to rate their agreement on the statement “I believe it is hard for young people (aged 25 or younger) to find suitable job,” 86% of respondents agreed or agreed strongly. Similarly to the statement “I believe it is hard for older people (aged 55 or older) to find a suitable job,” 89% of the respondents agreed or strongly agree, with only 2% of respondents strongly disagreeing.

The same question asked in the United States saw less pessimism when it came to young people, with only 64% of respondents agreeing with the statement. While for older workers agreement was similar with 87%.

Paired with these numbers the respondents felt that both younger and older workers would be willing to accept work below their education levels - with 86% agreeing that younger works would do so, and 77% agreeing that older workers would too. In the US, these figures are even more in the affirmative, with 90% of respondents agreeing that young people would accept such work, and 83% for older workers.

“In an increasingly competitive market, companies may be hesitant to make the larger investments in more experienced workers; or smaller investments in those who are untested. But as the labour market faces impending skills shortages, companies need to invest in training the new generation of workers to replace those skilled workers that will soon leave. They also need experienced workers who can act as mentors and help facilitate the integration of young employees,” says Jan Hein Bax, President, Randstad Canada.

Canadians believe in a diversified workplace

While people believe it is hard for both young and old people to find suitable jobs, they also think organizations should hire younger and older talent. 78% of those Canadians asked think it is good for their company to actively recruit young people, while 66% think it is good to recruit older people. And there could be good news on the horizon for both age groups, as the last Statistics Canada Labour Force study for May 2013 indicated a rise in employment in both the under 25s and over 55s. 

“As shown in the results of the Workmonitor survey, workers are embracing a more diversified workforce and are seeing the benefits of building a workplace with multiple generations. Older workers bring stability and a deep knowledge of their field, which can be instrumental in critical decision making. On the other hand, younger workers easily adapt to change and have a fresh outlook on the latest technology and industry trends that can lead to innovation in processes and product development. Organizations definitely benefit from both the invaluable experience of older workers and the creative thinking of the younger workforce,” adds Bax.

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About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

The Randstad Workmonitor

The Randstad Workmonitor was launched in 2003, and now covers 32 countries around the world, encompassing Europe, Asia Pacific, and the Americas. The Randstad Workmonitor is published four times a year, making both local and global trends in mobility regularly visible over time. 

You can download a copy of the quarterly survey here.

The quantitative study is conducted via an online questionnaire among a population aged 18-65, working a minimum of 24 hours a week in a paid job (not self-employed). The minimal sample size is 400 interviews per country, using Survey Sampling International. The 2nd wave of 2013 was conducted between 18 April and 3 May 2013.

For younger or older workers who need advice on their resumes, turn to our blog post on how to make the most of the experience you have.

For more information please contact

James Rubec at 416.962.9578 x2512

or Marie-Noelle Morency at 514.350.5309 x233

Are you ready? Financial services regulation reforms may catch some organizations off guard

 

TORONTO, May 23, 2013 – More than 25 per cent of Canadian financial services providers are either “not very” or “not at all” prepared for upcoming regulatory changes, according to a recent survey conducted by Randstad Canada in conjunction with Ipsos Reid.

The study polled 300 professionals in Canada’s financial services sector working in Operations, Management, Risk Management, Governance, and Regulatory Affairs. The findings highlight that while the majority of those polled felt that their organizations are reasonably prepared to implement these reforms, there remains a significant number of professionals working in the financial services industry who feel their organizations are not yet well prepared for upcoming changes to regulation. Furthermore, one-in-four (23 per cent) were unsure of the ability of their leadership teams at driving or effectively communicating strategies and programs to ensure compliance with tighter regulatory parameters throughout the organization.

“Changes are coming, and in some cases quickly’’, says Jean-Francois Vézina, Vice-President, Randstad Professionals. “The tightening of existing regulations such as Dodd-Frank, Basel III, ORSA, and FATCA will have profound effects on the financial services sector. Organizations will need to adapt to evolving demands under new, and in some cases more intense, regulatory scrutiny, and communicate effectively at all levels to sucessfully implement the necessary processes ”.

Throughout the financial services sector, opinions vary on how these new measures will impact business results. Of the respondents polled, 30 per cent of those familiar with the upcoming changes felt that new measures being put in place will have a positive impact on the business results of their organization, while one-in-five (21 per cent) felt they will have no impact. A further 22 per cent responded that they were unsure of how these new measures will impact their business results.

More than one-quarter (27 per cent) felt that new regulations planned to be put in place will actually have a negative impact on their business results, showing concerns that, upon implementation, new measures will impede their ability to operate in the same capacity – and achieve the same success as at present.

As for the impact on HR and talent management, of those polled, only one-in-four respondents (26 per cent) felt that the human resources function of their organization stood to face significant impact from these new demands.

“Regulatory reforms will almost assuredly result in new jobs across organizations, especially risk management roles that will be in high demand. Financial service providers will need to ensure that their current and future staff has the skillsets and the capabilities to ensure compliance with the revised regulations,” says Jean-Francois Vezina.

 “Those that take a forward-looking approach to attracting and retaining this talent at an early juncture will see the benefits of anticipating these changes and be well positioned to achieve a positive impact on their business results,” adds Vezina.

 

To request your copy of the study, please click here.

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About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca

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Confidence Leads Employees to Seek Out Greener Pastures

 

TORONTO, May 9, 2013 – Nearly two-thirds (31.8%) of Canadian employees have indicated they are likely to leave their current job in the next two years, according to the 2013 Randstad Award study, which gathered the opinions and perceptions of over 7,000 Canadian employees and job seekers. Additionally, more than half (54.4%) have indicated that the desire for more money and better benefits will influence their decision to look for a new employer.

 “The study response indicates that Canadians once again feel confident in the market value of their skills,” says Jan Hein Bax, President, Randstad Canada. “An improving economy leads to more and better choices for job seekers.”

 As important as salary and benefits are to employees, the study results indicate they are not the only factor determining job satisfaction. The study notes that Canadians also place high value on “a pleasant work atmosphere.” Close to a third of respondents indicated that a pleasant work atmosphere is one of the most important factors that would motivate them to stay with their current employer.

 Additionally, the study asked Canadian employees to define what a pleasant work atmosphere means to them. The factor “I am recognized when I do good work’’ made it to the top of the list (58%), followed by “Respect from colleagues’’ (55%), and “Feel part of a team’’ (51%).  More than half of respondents also defined “an interesting job” as one that that make good use of their skills.

 “The results clearly show that Canadian employees want to feel valued and useful at work,” adds Bax. “Organizations that can deliver a work experience that is both financially and professionally rewarding will maintain an edge in attracting and retaining the best talent available. Employers must demonstrate why their company and brand are more attractive and compelling than others.”

About the Randstad Award: The Randstad Award program is based on a robust research platform that gives unique insight into the key drivers of talent attraction within Canada and across the world.

Randstad has been working with globally respected research company, ICMA International, for over 10 years. In 2000, Randstad and ICMA launched the first Randstad Award program in Belgium to measure employer brands. Based on its success, Randstad had expanded the research program into 15 countries around the world. Visit http://www.randstadaward.ca

Randstad Award Methodology: The Randstad Award survey is based on the perceived attractiveness of companies in a specific market. The 150 largest employers per country are selected, each with at least 1,000 employees. The number of respondents on average per market is 7,000. This is a representative sample to measure attractiveness of the 150 companies. Samples are based on national demographics (age, region, gender, education level) with a slight emphasis on respondents aged below 40, potential workers being the target audience of the survey. Each sample is representative on age, region and gender and includes students, employed and unemployed workforce aged between 18 and 65 years old.

About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca

 

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Randstad Canada recognized as a “Best Workplace in Canada” for the 7th year in a row!

 

For the 7th year in a row, Randstad Canada has been recognized as a “Best Workplace in Canada” by the Great Place to Work ® Institute Canada (GPTW). Randstad is in 39th position on the prestigious list this year.

Once again, employee engagement is listed as a key criterion in the decision by GPTW.

“Employee engagement is not just a slogan at Randstad,” says Jan Hein Bax, president and country manager. “This organization sees its employees as its most valuable asset. Our staff are key to the ongoing success of the business and our ability to engage them speaks volumes about who we are and where we are going as the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR services.”

GPTW studies the world’s best workplaces and evaluates best practices that make them stand out from the crowd. GPTW develops its best workplace lists completely independently, without regard to any business relationships with individual companies. Its objective is to improve the quality of the workplace experience. GPTW believes that change can best be achieved by encouraging organizations to aspire to become their best. The approach is positive. By focusing on examples set by great workplaces, they spread the good news that any company anywhere can follow in their footsteps.

Randstad Canada continues to place a strong emphasis on employee development and training. The company strives to create a positive workplace where employees can realize their talents and career aspirations. It’s not just about “talking the talk.” This award proves that we can “walk the walk” too!

“We have great benefits and development programs here,” says Jan Hein Bax. “But it’s truly the culture of our organization that makes us such a great place to work. Creating a positive workplace environment is one of our core values. Everyone who works here is proud of the brand and works hard to ensure our commitment to excellence.”

More than 300 Canadian companies were nominated and more than 57,000 employees at those companies participated in the 2013 "Best Workplaces in Canada" survey.

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Spring cleaning – time to dust off your resume and ramp up your job search

 

TORONTO, April 11, 2013 – Spring is the season best known for cleaning, and for job searchers, it’s an ideal time to “usher out the old and bring in the new.” Randstad Canada has a few tips that could make an impact on your job search and help you ramp up for landing the perfect career opportunity.

Your resume should tell your story: Employers have heard bland, generic statements such as: I’m a hard worker, I learn quickly or I’m results-oriented, many times. If your resume sticks with these clichés, how will it make hiring managers remember you? Instead, tell them interesting stories! More and more, employers conduct accomplishment-driven interviews, and look for richness and diversity in your experience. Start by reviewing your resume and craft meaningful examples of challenges you met and solutions you have found to overcome them, without omitting the results.

Manage your own personal brand: Your online image does matter. Social media monitoring service Reppler surveyed more than 300 hiring professionals on their recruitment habits, and found that 91% of employers use social media channels such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn to screen job applicants. Google your name to see what comes up. Build a strong, employer-friendly presence online, by carefully selecting which content you want to post publicly. Another recent survey revealed that Linkedin is the most popular tool amongst staffing professionals, so be sure to have a comprehensive profile, one that is error-free  and attractive. Position yourself with a catchy subject line, describe your accomplishments in a clear and impactful way, and add your skills and expertise. Incidentally, employers are interested not just in “hard” professional skills but also in “soft” human skills, abilities and characteristics.  Ask for recommendations, share interesting articles in your field and take part in groups!

Get mobile job search apps: Utilizing the best apps, setting up job alerts, and organizing contacts on your mobile device are all excellent ways to find jobs and network with your mobile device.

Create a master job application: Save time and be ready whenever an opportunity comes up. Create a form with all of your up-to-date information,ensuring you have checked it for accuracy, grammar and spelling. Make sure to include correct addresses, job titles, employers, termination dates , contact names and phone numbers. This will be your source document for all applications.

Meet new people: Everybody uses social media to find a job or new talent, but that doesn’t mean you can’t benefit from personal interactions. Reach out to your contacts and go to networking events and conferences in your field. Put together a short and compelling description of who you are and what you do. Listen and ask questions, hand out business cards and build new relationships! Word of mouth and personal referrals are still methods that work in today’s job market.

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About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

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Women in leadership: Breaking through the glass ceiling

 

 

TORONTO, March 27, 2013 – Findings from Randstad's latest Global Workmonitor, surveying employees in 32 countries around the world, reveal that while most Canadian companies have more male than female managers (58%), 88% of Canadians believe in diverse and balanced women/men teams.

The need for diversity expressed by employees is also reflected in their opinions on women in leadership positions. Forty percent feel that there are not enough women in leadership positions at their current employer. The percentage is highest in in China (79%) and India (76%) where employees feel strongly about the need for more women in leadership positions. 

Furthermore, 68% of Canadian respondents believe that quotas forcing companies to promote more women to leadership positions are effective.

The study also reports that in Canada, employers encourage women to pursue leadership positions more often than in other countries (74%).

"Canadian employees are seeing the value of nurturing a mixed gender work environment, in the boardrooms as well," says Hanna Vineberg, Vice-President Central Ontario, Randstad Canada. "Companies who build balanced teams will resonate better with their current and potential employees, and will be better equipped to meet the needs of a market that is increasingly complex, demanding and diversified."

With regards to equity, 73% of respondents perceive that their employer rewards men and women equally in similar positions and only 28% think women make less money than men do in similar positions.

In a 2012 study conducted by Randstad polling women from across Canada, a majority of respondents felt there are still discrepancies compared to their male counterparts when it comes to salary. According to the survey, more than nine in 10 women in managerial positions in Canada say that they are still making less money than a man doing the same job.  

"The gap in perceptions is a clear indication that organizations still need to invest in promoting gender diversity, especially in more senior roles, and show how their career opportunities are as appealing to women as they are to men", adds Vineberg.  

 About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca  

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Job Growth for Engineers Strongest in Western Canada

 

TORONTO, March 7 2013 - The job market for engineers is strongest in western Canada according to data in the recently released report, Engineering Labour Market in Canada: Projections to 2020.

Sponsored by Randstad Engineering in conjunction with Engineers Canada, the report shows that there is “strong expansion demand” in that sector in British Columbia, Alberta, and the prairie provinces.


Here are some highlights:

  • Saskatechewan  - Engineering markets in Saskatchewan are more cyclical and more varied, but supply constraints are an issue. Resource projects are absorbing all available engineers – especially mining engineers. Saskatchewan is a small market with big project demands that come and go. Local post-secondary programs are not able to keep pace. Engineering immigration has been limited and strong current demand is reflected as Canadians from other provinces seek jobs and licensure in the province;
  • Alberta  - Along with B.C., Alberta is the strongest engineering market in Canada. There was strong engineering job growth in the past year, however there are ongoing shortages and recruiting challenges for engineers with five to 10 years of experience or specialized skills. Growth in enrolments in post secondary programs for engineers has lagged behing national trends and may contribute to a tight labour market;
  • British Columbia – One of the two strongest engineering markets in Canada, B.C. faces skills shortages and volatile markets in resource related occupations like mining, metallurgical, and petroleum engineers. However conditions are more balanced for computer and industrial engineers. B.C employers will need to source engineers from other markets, however it is hard to attract them from other western provinces due to competitive compensation levels;
  • Manitoba – Expansion demands are concentrated in resource and utility projects. Construction, particularly in electrical generation and transmission, is a big driver. Labour markets are divided with ongoing shortages and recruiting challenges for engineers with five to 10 years of experience or specialized skills.

On a national basis, expansion demand is expected to create an additional 16,000 jobs for engineers by 2020. Virtually all of these jobs will be west of Quebec, with the bulk of them in Alberta and British Columbia. Alberta specifically has lagged behind national trends in enrolments in engineering programs and an additional 900 engineers are needed annually to balance market demand. In Manitoba, increased construction activity, in particular in electricity generation and transmission, is leading to increased need for qualified engineers.

 “Employers in British Columbia will need to source engineers from other markets for much of the coming decade,” said Stephen McCrum, Vice President, Western Canada, Randstad Engineering. “The focus will be on specialized and experienced engineers to replace retiring workers.” The average age of employers in British Columbia is higher than in other provinces, raising replacement demand.


“In Saskatchewan specifically, engineering markets are in a state of flux,” McCrum said. “It is a small market, with big project demands that come and go. Local engineering programs are not meeting the cyclical demands of the market as Canadians from other provinces seek engineering jobs in Saskatchewan.”

The report suggests that markets will function better if human resources planning for engineers includes;

• Retaining older engineers in the workforce longer and adding to programs to accelerate on-the-job training of new graduates,
• Adapting post-secondary programs to meet the specialized needs of employers,
• Increasing the supply of engineers in western Canada, through post-secondary programs and immigration.

The report takes an in-depth look at the country’s current and projected engineering labour market conditions. It includes a detailed forecast of markets and key projects, along with changes in output and employment across Canada, from 2011 to 2020. It also features a thorough outlook that factors in economic and industry growth along with retirements and skill sets. It includes economic background with a detailed forecast of international conditions, commodity and financial markets, and a list of key industrial, resource, infrastructure, and other projects.

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Randstad Engineering is Canada's leader in Engineering Recruitment and Workforce Solutions. http://randstad.ca/engineering/

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About Randstad Canada: Randstad Canada is the Canadian leader for staffing, recruitment and HR Services. As the only fully integrated staffing company in the country, we understand the recruitment needs and demands of employers and job seekers across all levels and industries. Through our insightful knowledge of local markets, employment trends and global network of recruitment experts, we are shaping the Canadian world of work. Visit randstad.ca 

Engineering shortages lead Ontario job seekers to go where the action is

 

 

TORONTO, March 5, 2013 – Job seekers in Ontario should focus their training and job searches towards fields with looming skills shortages, according to Randstad Canada, the country's leading firm for staffing, recruitment, and HR services.

Given the importance of job creation for youth in Ontario, Randstad Canada believes it’s essential to channel young people entering the workforce into fields with high demand for talent, including engineering, IT, and skilled trades.

“In particular, it makes sense to encourage youth in Ontario to consider engineering as a worthwhile career option,” said Keith Wark, Vice President Central and Eastern Region, Randstad Engineering. “This is a sector that is clearly in need of seasoned professionals as older engineers retire. If we want to develop that pool of talent, we must hire and develop young engineers now.”

The recently released study, Engineering Labour Market in Canada: Projections to 2020, commissioned by Engineers Canada and sponsored by Randstad Engineering, reveals that Canada is facing a short supply of engineers with more than 10 years of experience, and that supply and demand imbalances in the engineering sector are becoming more serious, specifically in Ontario:

Findings from the Labour Market report note that resource projects in the north and infrastructure upgrades in most regions drive job creation, and that steady improvements in manufacturing create supply pressures for industrial engineers. Additionally, it notes that resource and infrastructure projects add jobs and create significant supply pressures for mining and civil engineers, while steady improvements in manufacturing create supply pressures for industrial engineers.

 Randstad Canada’s own projections see a growing demand for engineers in Ontario’s aerospace sector, which requires a highly skilled workforce to deal with aging commercial fleets that will soon need to be replaced. Demand is also growing for engineers in the construction sector, a result of new infrastructure projects. The growth in construction has resulted in an imbalance in the supply of engineers and other highly skilled workers.

 Construction activity has been growing and is expected to plateau from 2014 to 2016 and grow moderately, while resource activity in mining and other areas contributes to overall gains for engineers. Expansion demand is gaining momentum and markets are tightening quickly in resource related areas.

 While labour market conditions vary from region to region, Ontario in particular must find ways to strike a balance between retiring skilled engineers, and training incoming graduates and international candidates.

 “We are encouraged by the provincial government’s stated commitment to youth employment and its understanding of the needs of Ontario’s labour market, ” said Wark. ‘’New projects mean great prospects for young engineers, but employers will need to start hiring based on potential instead of just experience, as a way to counterbalance labour shortages.”

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